Skip to main content

Some Grandparents Need to get a Grip

Absolutely ridiculous!  That's how I describe a recent article I read about some grandparents wanting to pay cash money for the naming rights to their grandchildren. 

Last week, the New York Times reported about a new trend of grandparents offering cash and other incentives in exchange for naming their children's new babies, including one grandparent-to-be offering $10,000 for the naming rights to their grandson. This wasn't an isolated incident, with others offering things like a stake in a family business.

I thought the idea was so absurd but maybe I was in the "minority" as I often tend to be.  I decided to pose the question to my Facebook followers to gauge their radar on the subject and, lo and behold, we were all on one accord!

The best comments came from fellow grandparents like Auerlia who said, "That's just craziness if you ask me. I have 4 grands and never would never do such a thing even if I had all the money in the world. Grandparents obviously had their turn naming their own children...let the children have the same honor. #foolishness

From another friend, Heidi, who said, "No, No, No to cash or other rewards for naming a grandchild or anyone else's child. Only parents to name their child. Now it is ok to give ideas, share stories behind names if asked by the parents."

Another comment from Jessica, meanwhile,  indicates she did suggest a name, "When my daughter was pregnant, I suggested the name Carter, just because I really liked the sound of it. After months of tossing names around in her head, my daughter did choose Carter.   I didn't force it on her. She just ended up really liking my suggestion. It was kind of cool that she picked my favorite, I won't lie.

On the flip side of this you have young mothers who choose create their own names they think are unique and cute not realizing the child has to live with that name for the rest of their lives. And pity on them if they can't even spell it  The sad thing in these cases is the fact that most of these mothers are "young" (and poor) and haven't taken time to consider the long term effects of their child's name.  (Probably because their name is jacked up too!)  Furthermore,  the grandparents of these grandchildren probably can't even afford to offer any money for naming rights.  Poor and Green don't mix well in our society.

So for those well-to-do-grandparents  who believe money can buy anything, including naming rights to their grandchildren, GET A GRIP, try developing a REAL conscience and put your money to some quality use.

It is, however, okay for you to want to help your struggling children-------but NOT with strings attached.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Donald Trump Has Brought Out the Worst in America

This isn't meant to be another one of those bash Donald Trump blog posts.  This is, instead, a commentary on the negativity his campaign has sparked.  

Racists have come out of the woodwork like roaches in the dark.  For the most part, these supporters would be classified as poor whites, angry because they can't advance with little or no education and the majority of them would also be identified as angry white males.  They have taken off their hoods, jumped on his bandwagon, taken off their hoods and are leading the "make America great" campaign.  They have gotten behind a candidate who spews some of the nastiest comments and behaved in such a manner that has to embarrass any decent, conscientious, law-abiding white person in America.  

People like 78-year-old man John Franklin McGraw of North Carolina have felt free to assault non Trump supporters at presidential candidate's rallies.  "The victim deserved it.  The next time we see him we might have to kill h…

Thank You Lebron James for Fulfilling My Bucket Wish List

You can't grow up in Northeastern Ohio and not be a sports fan.  As a cheerleader in middle and high schools, I came to appreciate and UNDERSTAND the game of football and basketball.  

I remember Marion Motley from the OLD Cleveland (Bulldogs) Browns coming over our house to socialize with my parents.  (He and my mother went to high school together).  I remember  Brian Sipe and the "Kardiac Kids" who always had me on the edge of my seat when they were playing.  I remember how proud I was when my high school classmate Phil Hubbard made his presence known on the Cleveland Cavaliers, along with Brad Daugherty, Ron Harper and Mark Price (the Cavalier's three-point king).

But in all of those years, we never won a championship or even came close.  My saddest memory is the 1987 AFC Championship Game between the Browns and Broncos on January 17, 1988 at Mile High Stadium. With 1:12 left in the game, Browns running back Earnest Byner fumbled on the Broncos 1 yard line while try…

The Tragedy and Illusion of Facebook

"Things aren't always the way they appear."  No truer words could be spoken following the tragic death of Karen Smith in San Bernardino, CA this week.  She was murdered on her job---in a classroom where she was teaching young students.

What intrigued me about this story was the fact that she and her husband killer, Cedric Anderson were black baby boomers around the same age as my husband and myself.  I was particularly interested in the posts he made on Facebook.  By all accounts, he posted regularly on Facebook about the so-called love and admiration he had for his wife.  He created an image that was clearly contrary to the murderous behavior he demonstrated when he walked into her classroom and killed her.

In a February 27th post, he posted a selfie video and said:  "I love being married to Karen Smith-Anderson!"

March 11 post, he said: "My wife Karen Smith-Anderson is an Angel!!!"

March 12: He posted a youtube song by Sade titled By Your Side and said:…